Chyoger Tibet & China Treks

 
 
 
 

Treks, Tours & WorkshopsTibetan GrasslandsChinese Countryside

 
 

past trekkers' reviews

Trekker & Boy We had the most wonderful time with you and yours.  What you are doing is of the greatest importance.  How else can one even hope to get a sense of what Tibet is really about?  We could never have imagined.  We love everything about your treks.  The sight-seeing things we did (Forbidden City, etc) were sterile compared to our adventures with you, from the nun's temple to the top of Emei (we got the window home in 30 pieces which I am now reconstructing) to the top of the world. Djarga is the best.
                                               --Mac

Trekkers Thank you so much for the experience you provided me; thank you for sharing your heart with me, thank the Tibetans for sharing their hearts with me; the experience was incredible and I will remember it for the rest of my life. Participating opened my mind and heart in ways that are difficult to explain. The trek had a huge impact on me in a very positive way. Being exposed to the type of lifestyle the Tibetans live allowed me to see what is truly important in life: family. I do miss being there quite a bit, it seems that living in those mountains around those type of people creates such a pure lifestyle based on truth and peace, absolutely amazing. much love.
                                                                                                                      
 --Peter

A principle benefit, for me, of the trek and the time in the highlands has been, not so much the specific understanding of that place, those people (though any small understanding/experience I have gained of those has been enormously gratifying) but the very large change in perspective of the world from having known, personally, a family involved in pre-modern, traditional, non-agrarian life.Trekker & Tibetan Woman with Boy

The Kham are particularly significant to my understanding of my life since horses and (now) bovines play a large role in my experience of the modern world.

But the main difference is in seeing economics, politics, geography, history, anthropology, archaeology from the perspective of: This is a continuing, functional lifestyle for people. It has persisted, in a few places, for a very long time (ways of living do not inevitably change drastically; they require a greater-than-equal and opposite force). People in this traditional society are, for the most part, engaged and challenged by it. They are alert to the changing world around them but do not prefer it. Their difficulties are no more harrowing to them than ours to us.

Whenever I read anything, now, about pastoralists, about traditional societies, even about diet! (Reading Hamlin Garland set in 19th century Wisconsin: the family sits down to supper--milk and bread and honey--and the city visitor is horrified. "It's basically tsampa with the ingredients rearranged," I think. A sensible meal for northern farmers & herders).  
                                                                                                                           --Amy

Trekkers in Restaurant Hi! I made it back to Boston fine despite Air China's attempts to keep me in the country - Janice & I showed up early to the airport & the ticket agent switched me to the 9:00 flight to Beijing & failed to tell us this & we didn't look at the boarding pass. I didn't notice until I tried to board the 10:00 flight. I managed to get my ticket fixed in time so I made it on that flight OK. Which was actually sad since I had a superlative time in China & didn't want to leave - thanks again! --Rich

 

 

 

 

 

 
angela@definitelynomadic.com